Find the best sales candidate with these resume reading tips.

Sales teams are notoriously hard to build, and even harder to maintain. Sales amplification – one of the pillars of the Birthing of Giants Fellowship program – involves finding precision talent that with the right tools can sell smarter and bigger. True talent is hard to come by, but according to Birthing of Giants Board member, Vanessa Nornberg, you can pick out good sales candidates by looking at a few key indicators on their resume.

In her Inc.com column Vanessa details how she zeroes in on the right sales candidate with a few resume reading tips.

“I have learned that the best salespeople have resumes with certain things in common. I look for these things systematically now when I review resumes– because they are the subtle indicators of stability, strategy, and ultimately,  success.”

Objective – If your sales candidate included an objective on their resume, make sure that what they’ve said is in sync with the kind of person you’re looking to hire. According to Vanessa, phrases like “provide great customer service” or “grow with a company” could indicate the wrong kind of personality for sales.

Time on Job – This is true of just about any position that you’re recruiting for, but if someone has too many instances of less than a year on the job, consider it a warning sign that your sales candidate either isn’t a good fit for the role they’re going after, or isn’t in it for the long haul.

Past Experience – Vanessa advises you to watch out for words like “assisted,” “coordinated,” or “answered.” These kind of words indicate someone who did more assisting than selling. You want the one who was in the driver’s seat, not the passengers.

Hobbies and Interests – A great sales candidate is likely to be a well rounded person, able to speak comfortably with a wide variety of people. Give preference to recruits with outside hobbies. It indicates that they have a learning personality and a desire to discover – great traits in a salesperson.

Obstacles – Watch out for the sales candidate who has recently completed their education in a totally different field of study, or has recently studied but not yet earned their certification or degree. This person could have very different goals from your needs and won’t likely stick around for long.

Lies – Bad sales hires stretch the truth, and it comes out in their resume. Look for job titles out of proportion to what they’ve applied to your company for, or for other obvious exaggerations.

“Once all these dead-end prospects are eliminated, I can read the remaining few resumes for the skills and expertise offered, and start the recruiting process to further vet for the best candidate. “

You can read Vanessa’s article in its original form at Inc. Magazine’s website.